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The car has been created by a team of Formula 1 and aerospace experts with help from the Army’s Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers and technicians from the RAFs 71 Squadron who built the tail fin.

The current world land speed record of 763mph (1,227km/h) is held by Thrust SSC, a UK team led by Bloodhound’s Project Director Richard Noble and driven by Andy Green.

Bloodhound SSC’s record-breaking attempt will take place on the Hakskeen Pan, Northern Cape in South Africa.

The Bloodhound team will seek to reach 800 mph (1,287 km/h) and then 1000 mph (1,600 km/h) in tests to take place at Hakskeen Pan, a dried-out lake bed in Northern Cape, South Africa (artist's impression)

The Bloodhound team will seek to reach 800 mph (1,287 km/h) and then 1000 mph (1,600 km/h) in tests to take place at Hakskeen Pan, a dried-out lake bed in Northern Cape, South Africa (artist's impression)

The Bloodhound team will seek to reach 800 mph (1,287 km/h) and then 1000 mph (1,600 km/h) in tests to take place at Hakskeen Pan, a dried-out lake bed in Northern Cape, South Africa (artist’s impression)

Bloodhound has reached 1,000mph, but only in a computer model (pictured). October will be the first time that driver Andy Green will be able to test out the car's instrumentation and controls in the real world

Bloodhound has reached 1,000mph, but only in a computer model (pictured). October will be the first time that driver Andy Green will be able to test out the car's instrumentation and controls in the real world

Bloodhound has reached 1,000mph, but only in a computer model (pictured). October will be the first time that driver Andy Green will be able to test out the car’s instrumentation and controls in the real world

It was hoped the run could be attempted in 2016, but this has since been pushed back due to problems during testing.

The Bloodhound team scoured the globe to find the perfect desert to run the car on because it needed to be at least 12 miles (19km) long, two miles (3km) wide and perfectly flat.

Once they had settled on the Hakskeen Pan, a team of 317 locals were employed to clear the desert, they shifted 15,800 tonnes of stones by hand. 

At full speed Bloodhound SSC will cover a mile (1.6km) in 3.6 seconds, that’s 4.5 football pitches laid end to end per second.

The current world land speed record of 763mph (1,227km/h) is held by Thrust SSC, a UK team led by Bloodhound's Project Director Richard Noble and driven by Andy Green

The current world land speed record of 763mph (1,227km/h) is held by Thrust SSC, a UK team led by Bloodhound's Project Director Richard Noble and driven by Andy Green

The current world land speed record of 763mph (1,227km/h) is held by Thrust SSC, a UK team led by Bloodhound’s Project Director Richard Noble and driven by Andy Green

Bloodhound has three power plants, a Rolls-Royce EJ200 jet from an RAF Eurofighter Typhoon, a cluster of Nammo hybrid rockets and a 550 bhp Supercharged Jaguar V8 engine that drives the rocket oxidizer pump and between them they generate 135,000 thrust hp, equivalent to 180 F1 cars. 

Bloodhound’s wheels spin at 10,200rpm, 170 times per second, and they generate 50,000 radial G.

It will go from zero to 1,000mph (1,610km/h) in 55 seconds and back to zero again in a further 65 seconds, covering 12 miles (19km).

This deceleration will be at 3G, which has been compared to traveling from 60mph (97km/h) to standstill in one second.

The EJ200 jet engine fitted to the car consumes 64,000 litres of air per second, and this would suck all the air from an average sized house in 3 seconds.

The rocket system will work in tandem with the car’s Eurofighter jet engine, enabling it to travel at supersonic speeds. 



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